With ever-changing software technologies and increasingly sophisticated materials, the aerospace industry is a rapidly changing industry. The way the airlines are going to manage these changes and all those that are yet to come will shape the sector in the coming years.

With ever-changing software technologies and increasingly sophisticated materials, the aerospace industry is a rapidly changing industry. The way airlines are going to integrate these changes and all those that are yet to come will shape the sector in the coming years.

If the launch of a new device remains the most publicized event, what happens behind the scenes is no less crucial. The way in which devices communicate with other systems, collect data or move at altitude is as important as new equipment. The current economic context also plays a key role, influencing the way airlines reinvest their profits and plan for the future.

1. Software advances

Software technologies are continually pushing new boundaries. Their place today in the management of processes on board is therefore more important than ever. Among the tasks that depend the most on these softwares, landing safety monitoring is one of the most important. The landing procedure currently used by airliners is a step-by-step process where the aircraft communicates with the control tower at each stage of the descent. The current software advances will allow real-time tracking of the exact position of the aircraft until landing. This smooth descent will reduce flight time by an average of two minutes and save approximately 450 liters of fuel per flight, which will result in significant savings for airlines.

2. The low cost of oil

As the price of oil has been relatively low since 2014, the cost of airlines has decreased, to the benefit of their profits. The disadvantage of this trend for the environment and the future of many airlines is that they are much less eager to replace their existing fleet with newer, more fuel-efficient models. Companies investing in new aircraft today will therefore be ahead of their competitors when oil prices rise again, while others will see a loss of profits when they are already caught up. their technological backwardness.

3. New lighter devices

Companies that want to upgrade their fleet with lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft now have more options than ever before. The latest models, including the Boeing 787 and the Airbus A350, are built with rugged yet lightweight composite materials that allow them to be 20% more energy efficient than older models. In addition to the savings they can achieve, these aircraft can also fly at higher altitudes, resulting in less turbulence for passengers and therefore more comfort in flight. Among other new features that this new type of aircraft offers for the comfort of travelers, finally include the increased cabin pressure and air humidifiers that make the atmosphere more pleasant.

The emergence of new competitors in Asia

Given the attractiveness of costs in Asia, more and more manufacturers and suppliers decide to move there. Many of the major airlines have already relocated their maintenance and repair activities to Singapore, China or India. OEMs should therefore seriously consider investing in these countries if they want to stay in the race.

5. Aging infrastructure

Emerging markets have the strongest growth in demand, particularly in China and India. If, however, the sector wishes to benefit from the increase in air traffic, significant investments will have to be made in the infrastructure. Many airports and control facilities around the world are in fact largely out of date. To adapt to the increase in the number of passengers, governments will therefore have to find solutions to the problems of lack of available airspace and technological obsolescence.